October 11, 2018

Call for Proposals: Faculty Research Projects in Prince George

Written by

Living Labs invites faculty, students and/or alumni to apply for research projects to be produced in collaboration with Living Labs in Spring 2019.

Living Labs can provide administrative support to these projects and assist with local partnerships.

Background
In 2015, Emily Carr joined as a partner of the Wood Innovation Design Centre (WIDC) in downtown Prince George. WIDC is a provincial government project that is intended to contribute to the social and economic vitality of the region by contributing to objectives including:

  • Revitalization of downtown Prince George
  • Emerging practices of entrepreneurship, DIY manufacturing, and maker culture
  • Community and stakeholder-based approaches to designing flexible and responsive research or educational programming
  • New approaches to research or educational delivery in diverse communities
  • Multi-disciplinary and integrated strategies for innovation using wood

How to Apply
If you are interested, please get in touch with Kate Armstrong, Director, Living Labs karmstrong@ecuad.ca with the subject line “WIDC New Directions Application” and include a short description of what you are thinking about in terms of a project or approach by Friday, November 2, 2018.

Budget
Three projects will be realized in Spring 2019, each with a budget of $10K. Budget can be used for any combination of course release, travel, accommodation, RA salaries, or materials.

Previous Research Examples
A few of the Emily Carr research projects that have taken place in Prince George in the past include:

Omineca Arts Centre
Throughout 2017-2018 Living Labs worked with a group of Prince George-based artists, designers and musicians, mentoring them to achieve their goal of establishing a new artist-run centre in Downtown Prince George.

Beading and Caribou-Hair Tufting Workshop | Omineca Arts Centre
by Brenda Crabtree (Director, Aboriginal Gathering Place) and Kim Stewart (College of New Caledonia)
This 2017 workshop brought together a community of learners passionate about preserving and perpetuating traditional and contemporary Canadian Aboriginal art practices.

Float School
by Justin Langlois (Faculty of Culture + Community) and Holly Schmidt (Artist)
Float School (2017-present) interrogates the dominant narratives of public and private western education by exploring the form of a School through an examination of the earliest understanding of the word, drawing from the etymological base of skholē, which translates as spare time, leisure, rest, or ease. Float School will help us to spark the next phase of dialogue around socially engaged art, one that draws from Canada’s specific history of artist-run-culture, and generates an innovative new approach to locating art in rich and complex proximities to public, commons, the natural environment, and learning.

Design Wood Architecture and Sustainability
by Material Matters
The Design Wood Architecture and Sustainability (DWAS) partnership development project  supports a multidisciplinary and creative dialogue across sectors and amongst professionals in value-add wood product, design, engineering, architecture, fine art and material practice. Material Matters is engaging in partnership development with industry and academia in order to provide a platform for the integration of Design Practice and Design Research activities into the development of value-add wood product and the emergent fields of bio materials for additive manufacture. DWAS will initiate and sustain networking with professionals in the value-add timber industry, research and creative sectors in order to facilitate dialogue and awareness of BC’s natural resources and innovative material production.

Deadline:  November 2, 2018

Our Partners